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Booting Linux by the boot manager of Boot-US

Linux:
Linux can be installed on a primary or logical partition on any hard disk. In order that such a partition can be booted by the boot manager Boot-US a Linux boot loader, for example Grub2, must be installed onto the boot sector of the Linux partition.

The most simple is to install Linux onto a primary partition on the first boot disk. This case has the least impact on other operating systems. Linux can be started just by setting the Linux partition active using a standard MBR. It is not necessary to install a Linux boot loader into the MBR. The Linux boot loader must be installed only into the Linux partition.

If Linux is installed on a higher disk or on a logical partition then a Linux boot loader must be installed additionally in the MBR of the first boot disk for starting the Linux partition. This modification of the MBR usually happens automatically during the Linux installation. However it might affect negatively the startup of other operating systems.

Boot manager Boot-US:
The boot manager Boot-US can start Linux from a primary or logical partition on the first or a higher boot disk. It is only necessary to install a Linux boot loader, e.g. Grub2, onto the boot sector of the Linux partition. No further configuration of Grub2 is required. If Linux resides on a higher boot disk then the boot manager Boot-US passes the correct boot disk number internally to Grub2.

Drive and partition names:
Linux uses the following drive and partition names:

  • the first SCSI or SSD disk is called /dev/sda
  • the second SCSI or SSD disk is called /dev/sdb (etc.)
  • the first IDE disk is called /dev/hda
  • the second IDE disk is called /dev/hdb (etc.)
The partitions on a drive are named by the drive name appended by a number. For example sda2 refers to the second primary partition on the sda drive..

Installation target of Grub2:
During the installation of Linux usally a Linux boot loader (for example Grub2) is automatically installed. As already noted no special configuration of Grub2 is necessary. You only need to specify the correct installation target of Grub2. Supposed Linux is installed to sda2. Then Grub2 must be installed also to sda2 for allowing Boot-US to start the Linux partition. If you erroneously specify the target sda then Grub2 would be installed to the MBR of the sda drive.